'Sunshine Cleaning' Reviews

There’s a Bright Spot in “Sunshine Cleaning”

It’s rare that we stumble upon an indie film that we really hate. Admit it: sometimes they’re just so eccentric that we either have to like indie films for their originality or we’re so awestricken by their philosophical depth that we’re somehow tricked into liking them. However, with “Sunshine Cleaning,” the realness expressed through the plot as well as the acting needs no mind games to win over its viewers.

Sisters Rose (Amy Adams) and Norah Lorkowski (Emily Blunt) find themselves unhappy, to say the least, still living in the small town they grew up in. Rose, the older of the two and former head cheerleader of her high school, lives the typical single mom life, working at a dead-end job, cleaning the homes of those more affluent than her in order to support her ever peculiar son, Oscar. Continue reading There’s a Bright Spot in “Sunshine Cleaning”

'Sunshine Cleaning' Reviews

3 Stars: ‘Sunshine Cleaning’: Talent brightens up the gloom

The movie around them has problems, but Amy Adams and Emily Blunt put on a first-class acting workshop in “Sunshine Cleaning.”

In Christine Jeffs’ dour indie dramedy, they play Rose and Norah Lorkowski, Albuquerque siblings who aren’t handling adulthood very well.

The oldest, Rose (Adams), works for a housecleaning service and struggles to keep a roof over herself and her young son, Oscar (Jason Spevack). The kid is just plain weird — he’s about to be kicked out of elementary school for licking his teacher’s leg. Continue reading 3 Stars: ‘Sunshine Cleaning’: Talent brightens up the gloom

'Sunshine Cleaning' Reviews

Review: Adams, Blunt handle reeking havoc in ‘Sunshine Cleaning’

IT’S A LITTLE hard at first imagining such vibrant actresses as Amy Adams and Emily Blunt playing loser sisters in the offbeat dramedy “Sunshine Cleaning,” but they have you believing in their characters even if the rest of the film is a stretch.

“Sunshine Cleaning,” directed by Christine Jeffs (“Sylvia”), begins with a bang: A suicide splatters himself all over a sporting-goods store. Mac (Steve Zahn), the Albuquerque, N.M., cop investigating, notices how much the cleaning company charges to tidy up and mentions it to Rose (Adams), his former high school sweetheart with whom he’s now having an affair. Continue reading Review: Adams, Blunt handle reeking havoc in ‘Sunshine Cleaning’

'Sunshine Cleaning' Reviews

Another Positive ‘Sunshine Cleaning’ Review

Am I the only one on the planet who liked “Little Miss Sunshine,” sort of, without believing a second of it? I never believed those nutty, single-trait characters belonged to the same fractured family. I didn’t believe the rousing feel-good finale. What I liked, I liked because of what the performers did to transcend their own material.

I prefer the equally modest ” Sunshine Cleaning,” again without believing a second of it. It shares with the other audience-friendly “Sunshine” film a key word in its title; a setting, at least in part (Albuquerque); a key supporting actor ( Alan Arkin as a crusty paternal figure); and a rather studied sense of quirk. Nonetheless, the performers get a lot going, and the ensemble’s very easy company.
Continue reading Another Positive ‘Sunshine Cleaning’ Review

'Sunshine Cleaning' Reviews

‘Sunshine Cleaning’ Review

Despite its perky title, ‘Sunshine Cleaning’ is much darker than its producers’ previous film, ‘Little Miss Sunshine,’ as it ventures simply and realistically into suicide, adultery and loss. The film will be introduced to Turkish audiences at the 28th International Film Festival next month

It has become a genre all its own: the dysfunctional-family indie comedy, a staple of film festivals and art-house theaters alike.

Done wrong, and these movies can seem too self-consciously quirky (and by now, “quirky” feels like a word that was created especially to describe this kind of film). Done right, and you’ve got a “Little Miss Sunshine” or a “Juno” on your hands. Continue reading ‘Sunshine Cleaning’ Review

'The Young Victoria' Reviews

Blunt stars in The Young Victoria

Of all the love stories that have defined the British monarchy, none tugs the heartstrings quite like Victoria and Prince Albert.

The Young Victoria (PG) – partly filmed at Belvoir Castle – traces the romance from the initial sparks of attraction.

to marriage, revealing the private frustrations of the young queen as she attempts to walk a minefield of political intrigue and stringent social etiquette.

Everyone, it seems, wants to manipulate Victoria (Emily Blunt) for their own ends, all apart from Albert (Rupert Friend), who defies protocol to assist the princess in outwitting the schemers, telling her that she must stop being a pawn in other people’s games and take control. Continue reading Blunt stars in The Young Victoria